The GMAT verbal reasoning section is known for tricky critical reasoning and sentence correction questions that usually comprise confusing sentences and long reading passages. Furthermore, unlike the GMAT quantitative reasoning section where you need to answer a total of 31 questions within 60 minutes, the verbal reasoning section, on the other hand, has a total of 36 questions that need to be answered within 60 minutes. This means you can only afford to spend about one and a half minutes.

 This article will cover all you need to know about the GMAT critical reasoning and sentence correction questions asked in the verbal reasoning section of the test. So, read on. 

The GMAT Verbal Reasoning Section

To ace the GMAT exam you need to be proficient with the concepts of mathematics and English grammar. While the GMAT quantitative reasoning section tests your ability to solve a complex problem using basic math concepts, the verbal reasoning section, on the other hand, tests your command of the English language. Two main areas that you need to focus on within the verbal reasoning section are the GMAT critical reasoning and sentence correction. Besides these two, there’s also a reading comprehension question, however, in this article, we will be focusing on only the critical reasoning and sentence correction questions. 

Let’s understand in depth about the GMAT critical reasoning and sentence correction question types:

  • Critical Reasoning

Critical reasoning questions are the most prominent types of questions asked on the GMAT. The GMAT critical reasoning tests your critical thinking skills. Hence, to solve these questions, you need to apply logical reasoning and critical analysis of the scenario presented to you.

Here are a few tips to solve critical reasoning sections during your GMAT practice:

  • The GMAT test presents critical reasoning questions in long and confusing sentences. Hence, the best way to solve a critical reasoning question is to simplify the language.
  • Paraphrase the sentences in your own words so that you can clearly understand what is being said. You may want to make short notes to simplify the sentence.
  • Do not try to evaluate whether the question being asked is true or not. Rather approach the question based on your understanding of what is being said.
  • Sentence Correction 

While sentence correction questions on the GMAT are used to test your command of the English language and assess your writing skills. It does not test your level of awareness of English grammar. Hence, instead of trying to focus a great deal on memorising idioms and other complex rules of English grammar, you should focus on quick decision making. However, this does not negate the fact that you need some level of proficiency with English grammar. Here are a few tips to help you when preparing for sentence correction questions on the GMAT exam:

  • Skim and scan all the answer options provided to you quickly before you take a look at the actual question. By doing so, you will quickly ascertain the differences in the actual question and be able to tell whether the prompt is correct or needs correction. By starting with reading the question prompt, you will have to read the sentence in more detail to know whether it is right or wrong and then head over to the options to spot the right answer which is a lot more time-consuming. 
  • Use deduction to arrive at the right answer as opposed to selecting that which sounds good-to-be-true.
  • Make use of all the clues provided to select the remaining options after you have deducted those that were outright wrong.

All in all, the GMAT exam is all about time management and knowing the basics well enough to solve complex problems. Hence, it is essential to ensure that you’ve practised the basics well enough.

Now that we have given you a brief about the GMAT critical reasoning and sentence correction questions entail, start using these tips and strategies in your practice and improve your approach to solving GMAT verbal reasoning questions.   

 

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